Category Archives: History of Science

Has TB had its time?

In 19th century Europe, the Industrial Revolution brought on a new age of technological advancement. Cities saw an explosion in population growth. But with this came something more sinister – a mysterious disease which killed as many as one in four … Continue reading

Posted in Clinical and Medical Microbiology, History of Science | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

A history of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14

This month, the first paper describing Pseudomonas aeruginosa UCBPP-PA14 has been re-printed in the Journal of Medical Microbiology. Pseudomonas aeruginosa UCBPP-PA14 is a unique strain. It can cause severe disease in both plants and animals. Because of this, it is … Continue reading

Posted in Clinical and Medical Microbiology, History of Science, Publishing | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Keeping up with virus taxonomy

As sequencing technologies continue to become more efficient, more and more viruses are being discovered. Until recently, classification of these new viruses still relied upon information about physical properties. The ICTV has since embraced metagenomics, using sequence data to infer biological … Continue reading

Posted in Clinical and Medical Microbiology, History of Science, Virology | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Archaea and the Tree of Life

As part of the latest issue of Microbiology Today, called ‘What is life?’ (published online 10 May), we explore the Archaea. These are microbes that have been around since the beginnings of life on Earth, but were only discovered in the last 40 years. … Continue reading

Posted in History of Science, Microbial Evolution and Diversity, Video | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Vaccines: From the cowshed to the clinic

Vaccines are an essential component of public health, keeping people safe against disease. But how do they work, how are they manufactured and what are the challenges involved? We spoke to Dr Sarah Gilbert from the Jenner Institute to find … Continue reading

Posted in Clinical and Medical Microbiology, History of Science, Virology | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Revisiting the Ancientbiotics project

It was this time last year at the Annual Conference that Dr Freya Harrison from the University of Nottingham gave a talk about the rediscovery she and her colleagues made of a 1,000-year-old Anglo-Saxon treatment for eye infections. A year … Continue reading

Posted in Clinical and Medical Microbiology, History of Science | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Microbe Talk Extra: Culture Collections

Private Ernest Cable was a WW1 soldier who died on 13 March 1915 and his body now lies in a communal cemetery in Wimereux, France. Records suggest that Cable was the first British soldier in WW1 to die from dysentery … Continue reading

Posted in History of Science, Podcast | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment