Tag Archives: E. coli

Is Antarctic wildlife at risk from human E. coli?

Antarctica is the only continent on Earth without a native human population. But at any one time, there are still thousands of people living there, most of them scientists. During the course of their research, it’s inevitable that these scientists … Continue reading

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Surfer bums and antibiotic resistant bacteria

Are surfers at greater risk of being colonised by antibiotic resistant bacteria? Anne Leonard, a PhD student at the University of Exeter Medical School, is trying to find out. Anne is part of a research team led by Dr William Gaze … Continue reading

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Microbe Talk Extra: Something in the water

Where do antibiotics end up after we’ve used them? The answer is almost everywhere – in our soils and crops, in our rivers and in our drinking water. Is this something we should be concerned about? And is it driving … Continue reading

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Profile: Dr Marie Anne Chattaway

Society member Dr Marie Anne Chattaway works as a Clinical Scientific Lead for Public Health England (PHE), based in London, UK. We spoke to Marie about her career, her work for PHE and how working abroad can expand your scientific … Continue reading

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Antibiotic resistance transfer: where’s the culprit?

Escherichia coli is a species of bacteria that forms an essential part of the gut microbiome of many warm-blooded animals, including humans. Most strains are completely harmless to us, but some cause diseases including food poisoning and urinary tract infections. … Continue reading

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Not to be underestimated: nematodes learn to avoid smelly bacteria

There are many examples of remarkable intelligence from the animal kingdom: chimpanzees can learn sign language and use tools to gather food; elephants have been known to perform basic maths; and a Border Collie named Chaser knows over 1,000 different … Continue reading

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Hold tight: A mussel-inspired ‘living glue’

Many aquatic animals spend much of their lives stuck to surfaces that can include rocks, ships or even whales. Limpets and sea stars, for example, use a form of adhesion that allows them to move on the surface they have … Continue reading

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Flagella, more than meets the eye…

Yesterday at the SGM Autumn conference, we learnt a lot about bacterial flagella, which appear to be more than just propellers for swimming bacteria. Eliza Wolfson tells us about her research in E. coli and what it’s taught us. Enterohaemorrhagic … Continue reading

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Gut survival: a new E. coli protein player

Post by Greg Potter, Dalhousie University, Canada During a routine trip to the supermarket, consumers today can easily purchase foods sourced from all corners of the globe. Our supply does not come without its share of problems though; food safety … Continue reading

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